CAPE Awards

The Robert McC. Netting Award

Deadline: December 10th

Nominations should include the following:

1) A detailed nomination letter (no self nominations) describing the nominee, the significance of the nominee’s work, and his/her qualifications for the award

2) A detailed CV of the nominee.

On 4 February 1995, cultural ecologists lost one of their most distinguished colleagues. Dr. Robert McCorkle Netting, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Arizona, succumbed to bone cancer and complications resulting from valley fever. Netting’s professional career spanned more than 30 years. It was characterized not only by research and publications of the highest quality, but also by a deep appreciation for geography and geographers. Focusing on human-environment interactions, especially subsistence and development issues, his activities were, and his writings are, as much geographical as anthropological. He bridged the two disciplines perhaps as well as anyone else — particularly from the anthropological side.

In honor of Dr Netting, his life’s work, and his interdisciplinary spirit, the Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers has established an award made to individuals whose professional activities best embody those of Robert McC. Netting.
The award is named “The (year) Robert McC. Netting Award in recognition of distinguished research and professional activities that bridge geography and anthropology.”
The award is not necessarily made for any one piece of work or single activity. Rather, the award is issued for significant and substantial interdisciplinary work. It is not a “book award,” although the author of a particularly influential book would not be excluded. The intent is to recognize scholars who have: distinguished themselves through involvement with interdisciplinary geographical and anthropological projects, published extensively in both anthropological and geographical journals, produced work that is read and appreciated by practitioners in both fields, or conducted service to both disciplines that is meritorious.
The award is offered annually, though one need not be granted if a deserving candidate cannot be identified in a given year. Under no circumstances shall the award be issued to more than one candidate in a given year.
Awardees are selected by the officers of the Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group. Awardees do not have to be a member of the Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group, a member the Association of American Geographers, or a geographer.
The award, in the form of a plaque or framed certificate, is presented by the Chair of the Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group, or her or his designate, at the awards ceremonies at the annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers.
The James M. Blaut Award

Deadline: December 10th

Nominations should include the following:

1) A detailed nomination letter (no self nominations) describing the nominee, the significance of the nominee’s work, and his/her qualifications for the award

2) A detailed CV of the nominee.

On 11 November 2000, cultural and political ecologists lost one of their most committed colleagues, Dr. James M. Blaut, Professor of Geography and Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His professional career spans half a century and is characterized by, among other qualities, innovative research on tropical agriculture, development, and colonialism.

In honor and memory of his seminal contributions, the Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers has established an award made to an individual who publishes a book or journal article that best embodies the creativity and rigor of Jim Blaut’s own publications.
The award is named “The (year) James M. Blaut Award in recognition of innovative scholarship in cultural and political ecology, as demonstrated by publication of (article or book title).”
The award is made for a single publication that is clearly innovative and has the potential to be seminal in areas of research that are important to members of the Group. The intent is to recognize authors at any stage in their careers who demonstrate leadership through broadly influential, critical, innovative thinking. Jim Blaut’s publications on diffusionism and the colonizer’s model of the world provide models for judging such accomplishment. The publication can be a journal article or a book but must be sole-authored.
The award is offered annually, though one need not be granted if a deserving candidate cannot be identified in a given year. Under no circumstances is more than one award made annually. The book or article must have been published within the two calendar years preceding the year of award.
On the basis of nominations by the general membership of the Group, members of its Board will agree upon a process to select the awardee. Nominations must be accompanied by full publication details and a rationale for making the award on the basis of that publication. Nominees need not be academics, geographers, members of the Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group, or members of the Association of American Geographers.
The award, in the form of a plaque or certificate, is presented by the Chair of the Group or her or his designate at the awards ceremonies at the annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers.

AAG-CAPE Student Paper Award

Deadline: TBA (typically one month prior to the Annual Conference)

The Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group sponsors an annual award to recognize distinguished student research. Candidates may be undergraduates, graduate students, or a recent Ph.D. within a year of their dissertation defense. The student must be a member of AAG-CAPE and the sole author.

Judging criteria include the soundness and creativity of the research design and methodology; validity of conclusions; and writing quality. The paper should not exceed 8,000 words including all components: references, footnotes, abstract, illustrations, tables and any other text. This is a common length required by journals where CAPE members commonly publish. Papers exceeding 8,000 words will not be considered for the award.

A prize of $100 will be awarded for the best paper. Previous awardees have found that the prestige attached to this award has made it easier to attract further funding and scholarly attention. The award will be announced in the Cultural & Political Ecology and AAG newsletters.

A copy of the paper must be submitted by the announced date – typically one month prior to the Annual Conference. Please send the paper as an attachment (PDF format preferred) to the CAPE Secretary/Treasurer. The results will be announced in the Cultural & Political Ecology Specialty Group Business Meeting at the AAG Annual Conference.

Questions? please contact the CAPE Secretary/Treasurer or Chair.

PREVIOUS WINNERS: STUDENT PAPER AWARD 

2016, Lily House-Peters, University of Arizona, Social-Ecological Transformations and Riparian Enclosure: The Production of Spaces of Exclusion and the Uneven Development of Resilience in the Sonoran Borderlands.

2015, Emma Gaalaas Mullaney, Departments of Geography and Women’s Studies, Penn State University Maiz, Desmadre: Social Difference, Biodiversity, and the Creolization of the Anthropocene

2014, Katherine MacDonald, Department of Geography, York University Rupununi Hauntings: Impacts of the Cattle Industry and Road Development in the Guyanese Amazon

2013, Cedar Louis, Department of Geography, University of Hawai’i- Manoa “We plant only cotton to maximize our earnings”: The paradox of food sovereignty in rural Telengana, India

2012, Tim Baird, Department of Geography, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Conservation, Disturbance and Livelihood Diversification in Northern Tanzania

2011, Julian S. Yates, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia Institutional Complexity in Governing the Scalar Politics of Livelihood Adaptation in Rural Nepal

2011, Ellie Andrews, Department of Geography, Penn State University     Landowner Coalitions in the Marcellus Shale: A Political Ecology Perspective

2010, Andrew Roberts, PhD Program in Biology, City University of New York Graduate Center/New York Botanical Garden
The Hillock Depression Complex: illegible landscapes and land use in spatio-temporal context on the Tonle Sap floodplain, Cambodia

2009, Matthew Himley, Department of Geography, Syracuse University
On Method and Metric: The Politics of Assessing Mining’s Environmental Impacts in Andean Peru

2008, Clark L. Gray, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Environment, Land and Rural Out-Migration in the Southern Ecuadorian Andes

2007, Arielle Levine, University of California – Berkeley
Staying Afloat: State Agencies, Local Communities, and International Involvement in Marine Protected Area Management in Zanzibar, Tanzania

2006, Ryan Galt, University of Wisconsin – Madison
Export Farmers’ Responses to U.S. Pesticide Residue Regulations: The Political Ecology of Regulatory Risk, Caution, and Local Interpretations in Costa Rica

2005, Claudia Radel, Clark University
Converging Conservation and Women’s Gender Interests in the Southern Yucatan

2004, Farhana Sultana, University of Minnesota
Water Water Everywhere, but Not a Drop to Drink: Analyzing the Drinking Water Crisis in Bangladesh

2003, Lydia Breunig, Arizona
Landscapes of Work to Landscapes of Leisure: Mexico’s Natural Protected Areas in the Context of Neoliberalism

2002, David Carr, University of North Carolina
The Event Ecology of Deforestation on the Agricultural Frontier: the Sierra de Lacandón National Park, Guatemala

2001, Paul Laris, Clark University
Fire Dynamics in Mali

2001, Bradley Walters (runner-up), Rutgers University
Human Ecology, Philippine Mangroves

2000, William Moseley, University of Georgia
Globalization, Cotton Production and Poverty-environment Interactions in Mali

2000, Elizabeth Olson, University of Colorado
NGOs in Peru

1999, Thomas Perreault, University of Colorado
Indigenous Organizations and Identity Construction in Ecuadorian Amazonia

1998, Dan Klooster, University of California-Los Angeles
Community Forestry in Mexico

1998, Bjorn Sletto,Kansas
Political Ecology of the Nariva Swamp, Trinidad

1997, Douglas E. Deur, Louisiana State University

1996, Simon Batterbury, Clark University
Planners, or Performers? Agricultural Knowledge in Burkina Faso and Niger

1996, Chris Coggins (runner-up), Louisiana State University
Cultural Ecology, Landscape Ecology, and Nature Conservation in the Southeastern Chinese Uplands

1995, Annmarie Terraciano, University of Wisconsin
Contesting Terrains: Tenure Reform and the Social Dimensions of Land Conflict

1995  Juanita Sundberg (runner-up), University of Texas
NGO Landscapes, Conservation in the Maya Biosphere Reserve, Peten, Guatemala

1991 Robert Kuhlken, Louisiana State University
Settin’ the Woods on Fire: The Cultural Ecology of Rural Incendiarism

1990 Karl Zimmerer, University of North Carolina
Common Field Agriculture in the Central Andes: Struggles Over Production, Space and Ecology in the 16th – 20th Centuries

1990 Tom Whitmore (runner-up), Clark University
Dynamic Systems Modeling in Cultural Ecology


AAG-CAPE Field Study Award

Deadline: TBA (typically one month prior to the Annual Conference)

Students are invited to submit applications for the CAPE Field Study Award. One or two awards of up to $500 (subject to approval by the CAPE Awards Committee) will be granted annually. The principal objective will be to defray travel expenses for reconnaissance fieldwork in support of future thesis or dissertation activities. The award will be oriented primarily to those without other substantial funding. The award is not intended to finance dissertation fieldwork (though funding can be used to support Master’s degree thesis research). Eligible candidates must be a member of the AAG and CAPE at the time of submission.

Proposals should include:

1) title page with name of applicant, address and phone number, title of intended research, starting date and duration of field reconnaissance, and location of research;

2) project description of no more than 1000 words (excluding references) indicating proposed travel and research, expected significance, and probable research methodology;

3) list of cited references;

4) statement of how award will be allocated, e.g. air travel, surface travel, food and lodging, etc.;

5) curriculum vitae.

A copy of your proposal should reach the CAPE Secretary/Treasurer by the announced date – typically one month prior to the AAG Annual Conference. Notification of the results will be made as soon as possible. The results will be announced in the Cultural & Political Ecology Specialty Group Business Meeting at the AAG Annual Conference.

Questions? Please contact the CAPE Secretary/Treasurer or Chair.

PREVIOUS WINNERS, FIELD STUDY AWARD

2016, Angela Seidler, University of South Carolina.

Socioenvironmental Effects of the Northern Cyprus Water Supply Project: Shifting water access of farmers in Southern Turkey.

2016, Jonathan McCombs, University of Georgia.

White Washing Green Spaces: Race and Nature in the Gentrification of Budapest’s Eighth District.

2015, Sophia Borgias, Department of Geography, University of Arizona

Conflict, Change, and the Challenges of Water Governance in Chile’s Maipo River Basin

2015, Olivia Molden, Department of Geography, University of Oregon

Downstream of Melting Glaciers: Climate Change Knowledge in Nepal’s Himalayas

2014, Emma J. Lawlor, Department of Geography, University of Arizona

A Debated Sickness: Framings of Disease, Agro-Labor, and Sugarcane in Central America

2014, Galen Murton, Department of Geography, University of Colorado Boulder

Cultivating Consumption: The cultural and political dimensions of Trans-Himalayan trade fairs in Tibet

2013, Shana Hirsch, Department of Geography, University of Victoria

Making National Natures: The coproduction of nature and Scottish nationalism

2013, Chris Knudson, Department of Geography, Clark University

Modeling risk, modifying behavior: The introduction of novel weather insurance in St. Lucia

2012, Kayla Yurco, Department of Geography, The Pennsylvania State University

2010, Claude Peloquin, School of Geography and Development, University of Arizona

Colonialism, development and the institutional dimensions of human-locust relations  in Western Africa

2010, Emma Gaalaas Mullaney, Departments of Geography and Women’s Studies, The Pennsylvania State University
Social Relations of Maize: Agricultural Modernity and Livelihood in Mexico’s Central Highlands

2009, Brittany Davis, Dept of Geography and Regional Planning, University of Arizona
Unintended Ecologies of Marine Protection: Exploring livelihood adaptations and ecological outcomes in Quintana Roo, Mexico 

2009, Zoe Pearson, Dept of Geography at Ohio State University
Oil, Conflict and Territory in Yasuní National Park, Ecuador

2008, Leslie McLees, The University of Oregon
Saving the Farm: Understanding the Functions of Urban-Ecological Spaces in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

2008, Zachary Hurwitz, The University of Texas – Austin
Clean Development? The Carbon Market and the Making of Hydroelectric Dams in Brazil

2007, Darrell Fuhriman, The Pennsylvania State University
Dangerous Donations: Discarded Electronics in Accra, Ghana

2006, Katharine Meehan, University of Arizona
The Abject Commodity: Spatial Perceptions of Sewage in San Diego-Tijuana

2005, Andrew Roberts, CUNY-NYC
Fields in Transition, Livelihoods in Transition: Agrodiversity and Incremental Change in Smallholder Managed Landscapes in Cambodia

2004, Clark Gray, North Carolina
Transnational Migration and Environmental Change

2003, Bonnie Kaserman, UBC
Scientific Citizenship in the U.S. Context

2002, Brian King, Colorado

In the Shadow of Kruger: Community Conservation in the Former KaNgwane homeland, South Africa

2001, Elizabeth Olson, Colorado
Religious NGOs in Peru

2001, Claudia Radel (runner-up), Clark
Belize/Mexico

2000, Jeff Bury, Colorado
Mining Impacts in Peru

2000, Ryan Galt, Madison

1999, William Moseley, Georgia
Food Security in Mali

1998, Robert Daniels, Illinois
Parks in East Africa

1998, Eric Carter, Madison

1997, Kathryn Pearson, Arizona
Sustainable Marine Resource Use and Gender, Baja California Sur, Mexico

1997, Michael K. Steinberg, Louisiana State

1996, none

1995, Karen Patterson, Virginia Tech
Gender-based Household Variations in Attitudes, Behavior, and Practices: The Impact of Pesticide Use in Jamaican Nontraditional Agricultural Exports

1995, Andrew Stuart (runner-up), Rutgers
Of Turtles and People: Conflict and Cooperation on the Pacific Coast of Nicaragua, 1983-1995